$20.00 - 1873-CC PCGS MS60

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$20.00 - 1873-CC PCGS MS60

57,500.00

Date…….1873-CC
Grade…….PCGS MS60
PCGS Price Guide………46500
Population (PCGS)…….7/8
Population (NGC)……...12/7
Serial Number…….8968.60/36182288
PCGS Lookup Number…….8968

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The 1873-CC double eagle compares favorably to the 1872-CC in terms of overall rarity. In Uncirculated, the 1872-CC is slightly rarer. My best estimate is that there are around a dozen properly graded Uncirculated 1873-CC double eagles with nearly all in the MS60 to MS61 range. The finest is a single PCGS MS63 which has been off the market for a decade.

I purchased this coin in a very old NGC MS60 holder and spent months (and a ton in grading fees!) trying to get it into an MS61 holder. I still believe this coin is a full MS61 and I base this on having owned a number of other 1873-CC double eagles graded MS60 and MS61 by PCGS.

This coin has great overall eye appeal with blazing mint luster seen on both the obverse and the reverse. This date is usually dull and the majority of the higher grade pieces known have been repatriated from overseas where they were dulled by long-term vault storage. Both sides are light rose at the centers and are contrasted by vibrant natural golden-orange hues towards the borders. For the grade, the surfaces are less abraded than one would expect, with the majority of the marks concentrated in the lower left obverse field. Two light copper spots at the base of Liberty’s neck serve as quick identification.

There has not been a PCGS MS60 1873-CC double eagle which has sold at auction since all the way back in April 1999, while the last NGC MS60 sold at auction in June 2004. The most recent APR for a PCGS MS61 is Heritage 2/14: 5420 which sold for $61,717, but had a number of detracting mint-made black grease spots on the obverse.

If you are assembling a world-class set of Carson City double eagles, it is likely that the 1873-CC represents a hole which you would like to fill with a nice Uncirculated coin. Given the rarity of this issue in Mint State (they seem to come available—in PCGS holders—around once or twice every decade or so) the opportunity which this nice, fresh example represents is likely to cause a commotion.